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COMPACT RADAR SURVEILLANCE

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Perimeter surveillance radar (PSR) is a class of radar sensors that monitor activity surrounding or on critical infrastructure areas such as airports, seaports, military installations, national borders, refineries and other critical industry and the like. Such radars are characterized by their ability to detect movement at ground level of targets such as an individual walking or crawling towards a facility. Such radars typically have ranges of several hundred metres to over 20 kilometres.

Alternate technologies include laser-based systems. These have the potential for very high target position accuracy, however they are less effective in the presence of fog and other obscurants.

Characteristics

PSR does usually have the following required characteristics: No operator required: The radar autonomously detects movement in a defined area, tracks those targets and raises an alarm if the targets cross into alarm areas. Export of target data: The radar not only has its own dedicated display and alarm system, but also outputs data to other systems that form the security network. A typical interface system today would include target data output over Extensible markup Language (XML) at a useful target data rate (0.1 Hz to 1 Hz). Coverage: a radar that covers more area can be potentially more useful than radar that covers a limited sector. Most PSRs cover a 360° area and some are limited to sectors of 80 to 180° by their design. Resolution: a radar that operates at higher frequencies and with narrower beams will determine target positions most accurately. Low false alarm rates: a radar that puts out false targets is at best an irritant and tactically can confuse the security team. (A false alarm should not be confused with a nuisance alarm caused by, for example, an animal).